New LinuxCOE helps admins customize distros

This is a really neat idea. You can roll all of your scripted installations for all of your distributions into one application, instead of configuring each distributions application. For example, if you wanted to install RedHat, you no longer need Kickstart. The same would go for Ubuntu, no more preseed. Just one application to handle all of the scripted installations. New LinuxCOE helps admins customize distros - Hewlett-Packard released version 4 of its Linux Common Operating Environment (LinuxCOE) software this month. LinuxCOE is a front end to a set of Perl scripts that helps administrators by building customized install images for various Linux... [Linux.com]

This is a really neat idea. You can roll all of your scripted installations for all of your distributions into one application, instead of configuring each distributions application. For example, if you wanted to install RedHat, you no longer need Kickstart. The same would go for Ubuntu, no more preseed. Just one application to handle all of the scripted installations.

New LinuxCOE helps admins customize distros - Hewlett-Packard released version 4 of its Linux Common Operating Environment (LinuxCOE) software this month. LinuxCOE is a front end to a set of Perl scripts that helps administrators by building customized install images for various Linux... [Linux.com]
0 Shares:
You May Also Like

TweakVista open beta begins

Having problems with customizing your Vista? Look no further, TweakVista will allow you to do what you want with Vista.
TweakVista open beta begins - Popular tweaking site TweakVista.com and Stardock have teamed up to create a new utility for Windows Vista users called TweakVista. TweakVista allows users to change many low level settings in Windows Vista as well as makes many lesser known settings more user-friendly. The utility has settings for security (to manage the UAC), memory optimization, resource control, start-up management, performance assessments, benchmarks, and integration with TweakVista.com.


Read full story...

[NeoWin-Software]

Good Ways To Join an Open Source Project?

Good Ways To Join an Open Source Project? - Tathagata asks: "I'm a student, on my final year in a college in India, and I have been using GNU/Linux for quite sometime now. Though I'm from a Computer Science background, getting into a project that involves serious programming was not possible, as people (read teachers) run away if you utter the word 'Linux'. They are generally not bothered about mentoring someone on an exciting project, and they would suggest you to get settled with Visual Basic, .NET, — and would prefer a 24 hour solution when it comes to programming. So, my programming endeavors have remained limited to writing few lines of C/C++, or Java. For last few days, I've been googling, and trying to read how to join an existing Open Source project." What suggestions would you pass along to someone who is willing to join his first Open Source effort?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

More Than Half of Known Vista Bugs are Unpatched

More Than Half of Known Vista Bugs are Unpatched - MsManhattan writes "Microsoft security executive Jeff Jones has disclosed that in the first six months of Vista's release, the company has patched fewer than half of the operating system's known bugs. Microsoft has fixed only 12 of 27 reported Vista vulnerabilities whereas it patched 36 of 39 known bugs in Windows XP in the first six months following its release. Jones says that's because "Windows Vista continues to show a trend of fewer total and fewer high-severity vulnerabilities at the six month mark compared to ... Windows XP," but he did not address the 15 unpatched flaws."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

Intel Preps Dual-Core Celeron Microprocessors

I remember the first Celerons or 'Cellys' back in the day. Cheap and relatively good for someone who can only work on one task at a time. Not for an uber geek or insane multi-tasker as you would be able to tell whether or not you were using a Celeron by just sitting down and using the PC for 15 minutes. Either way, an affordable alternative to the current Intel Core Duos.
Intel Preps Dual-Core Celeron Microprocessors - Multi-core chips are sweeping the processor market and single cores are becoming harder and harder to find. This trend is about to go through the roof while prices plummet to the basement.