Error’d: More Like Didgeridon’t! 4G Australian Time Zone Application

Error'd: More Like Didgeridon't! – If you were tasked with building a time zone synching application, you could probably do it in less than 1MB. Maybe you Linux guys could write it in one line of Perl (or at least brag about having the ability to write it in one line of Perl). Hell, maybe you’d just use the built-in synching functionality in your favorite OS. Anyhow, I can’t imagine the crazy Western Australian rules for calculating time that make this software baloon to 4GB. (submitted by Marty)     [The Daily WTF]
Error'd: More Like Didgeridon't!

If you were tasked with building a time zone synching application, you could probably do it in less than 1MB. Maybe you Linux guys could write it in one line of Perl (or at least brag about having the ability to write it in one line of Perl). Hell, maybe you’d just use the built-in synching functionality in your favorite OS. Anyhow, I can’t imagine the crazy Western Australian rules for calculating time that make this software baloon to 4GB.


(submitted by Marty)

 

 

[The Daily WTF]


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