Writers Write “B-Logs,” Get Money

This is an interesting read of other people in the business that write all about technology and get paid for it. I guess we’re all trying to get to a point in our life where we can do something we enjoy and also be financially stable at the same time. This is a good way to start. Writers Write “B-Logs,” Get Money – USA Today, that bastion of hard news, is covering a new fad popular with the kids called “B-logging.” They talk about two “b-loggers,” Om Malley and Mike Orvington, who used to work at real jobs and now eat ice cream and write about computers. Now I don’t know who these people are or what they think they’re doing, but I think it’s bad to show people that you can make “real money” — how much, Om Malley? $5? HA! — doing this. There are jobs that Americans should be doing — car repair, HVAC installation, dance instruction — that are going empty while these two jokers sit around all day pretending to work. For shame. “B-logging,” like stamp collecting and religious observance, should be considered a hobby and nothing more. Let’s not encourage these bozos. Tech blogs go from hobbies to businesses [USAToday] [CrunchGear]

This is an interesting read of other people in the business that write all about technology and get paid for it. I guess we’re all trying to get to a point in our life where we can do something we enjoy and also be financially stable at the same time. This is a good way to start.

Writers Write “B-Logs,” Get Money

arringtonmalikx.jpgUSA Today, that bastion of hard news, is covering a new fad popular with the kids called “B-logging.” They talk about two “b-loggers,” Om Malley and Mike Orvington, who used to work at real jobs and now eat ice cream and write about computers.

Now I don’t know who these people are or what they think they’re doing, but I think it’s bad to show people that you can make “real money” — how much, Om Malley? $5? HA! — doing this. There are jobs that Americans should be doing — car repair, HVAC installation, dance instruction — that are going empty while these two jokers sit around all day pretending to work. For shame. “B-logging,” like stamp collecting and religious observance, should be considered a hobby and nothing more. Let’s not encourage these bozos.

Tech blogs go from hobbies to businesses [USAToday]

[CrunchGear]


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