Web 2.0: Apps for the well-organized student

Web 2.0: Apps for the well-organized student – Read/WriteWeb has created a list of their top web applications for students – but honestly, anyone who wants to be more organized could benefit from this list. Many of these have been featured here at Lifehacker central; however, I really like how this list is organized into specific categories: office replacements, taking notes, mind mapping, studying, bookmarking, collaboration, calendars, calculators, and more. Do you see anything missing from this list? Let’s hear it in the comments. Web 2.0 Backpack: Web Apps for Students [Read/Write Web] [LifeHacker]
Web 2.0: Apps for the well-organized studentpencils.png

Read/WriteWeb has created a list of their top web applications for students – but honestly, anyone who wants to be more organized could benefit from this list.

Many of these have been featured here at Lifehacker central; however, I really like how this list is organized into specific categories: office replacements, taking notes, mind mapping, studying, bookmarking, collaboration, calendars, calculators, and more. Do you see anything missing from this list? Let’s hear it in the comments.

[LifeHacker]


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