Domain Name Portfolio 0.6.2 (Default branch)

This is a very interesting application, if you have lots of domain names that you’re looking to sell. This application can do everything for you. Domain Name Portfolio 0.6.2 (Default branch) – Domain Name Portfolio is a Web based application to help domain owners better organize their portfolio. It allows you to list your domains with their expiry date, registrar, price, status, and category. It also allows visitors to your portfolio to contact you about a given domain. License: GNU General Public License (GPL) Changes: A bug in the emailer class which caused a parse error was fixed. [FreshMeat]

This is a very interesting application, if you have lots of domain names that you’re looking to sell. This application can do everything for you.

Domain Name Portfolio 0.6.2 (Default branch)Screenshot
Domain Name Portfolio is a Web based application to help domain owners better organize their portfolio. It allows you to list your domains with their expiry date, registrar, price, status, and category. It also allows visitors to your portfolio to contact you about a given domain.
License: GNU General Public License (GPL)
Changes:
A bug in the emailer class which caused a parse
error was fixed.

[FreshMeat]

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