Samsung’s 3G SGH-T639 being sold by T-Mobile

Touted as the first 3G enabled phone for T-Mobiles network. Samsung's 3G SGH-T639 being sold by T-Mobile – This summer, we all got our hopes up when Samsung’s (apparently 3G-enabled) SGH-T639 found its way into the FCC, and now that the handset is reportedly on sale in New York City, it’d be a great time to work yourself into a tizzy once more.

Touted as the first 3G enabled phone for T-Mobiles network.

Samsung's 3G SGH-T639 being sold by T-Mobile – This summer, we all got our hopes up when Samsung’s (apparently 3G-enabled) SGH-T639 found its way into the FCC, and now that the handset is reportedly on sale in New York City, it’d be a great time to work yourself into a tizzy once more. According to PhoneScoop, the 3G-capable T369 is indeed “the first phone to be compatible with T-Mobile’s 3G network, even though the network is not yet up and running.” Oddly enough, Samsung managed to conceal this dirty little secret just yesterday, but now that the truth is out there, all that’s left to do is hope that this release means that T-Mobile’s 3G launch is coming sooner rather than later. [EnGadget]


Did you like this article?


0 Shares:
You May Also Like

Final Draft of GPLv3 Allows Novell-Microsoft Deal

Final Draft of GPLv3 Allows Novell-Microsoft Deal - famicommie writes "All of Novell's fingernail biting has been for naught. In a display of forgiveness and bridge building on behalf of the FSF, ZDNet reports that the final draft of the GPLv3 will close the infamous MS-Novell loophole while allowing deals made previously to continue. From the article: 'The final, last-call GPLv3 draft bans only future deals for what it described as tactical reasons in a 32-page explanation of changes. That means Novell doesn't have to worry about distributing software in SLES that's governed by the GPLv3 ... Drafting the new license has been a fractious process, but Eben Moglen, the Columbia University law school professor who has led much of the effort, believes consensus is forming. That agreement is particularly important in the open-source realm, where differing license requirements can erect barriers between different open-source projects.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

CE-Oh no he didn’t, part XXXV: NBC sez piracy hurts ‘corn growers’

CE-Oh no he didn't, part XXXV: NBC sez piracy hurts 'corn growers' -

Filed under: ,

Although some may argue that piracy is (at least on some level) beneficial, it looks like NBC has taken that sentiment to the opposing extreme with its latest comments. In a purported filing with the FCC calling for enhanced regulation of the internet in an attempt to stifle evil P2P activity, NBC blurted out a string of text that it surely hoped would be overlooked. Alas, hardly any ridiculous claims go unseen these days, so now we're faced with this gem: "In the absence of movie piracy, video retailers would sell and rent more titles. Movie theaters would sell more tickets and popcorn. Corn growers would earn greater profits and buy more farm equipment." There's absolutely no need for us to pick apart the aforementioned quote, after all, we're fairly certain the absurdity shines right through on its own.

[Via TechDirt, image courtesy of Monsanto]

 

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

[EnGadget]

Playing Loud Music Means Copyright Lawsuit for Public Performance in UK

This story is pretty insane, just because someone can hear the loud music its considered a public performance? Sue..Sue..Sue.
Playing Loud Music Means Copyright Lawsuit for Public Performance in UK - Employees at many companies listen to music while they work, but one business in the UK is being targeted with a hefty £200,000 copyright infringement suit because the music was played too loudly. The UK-based Performing Rights Society—a group that collects royalties for publishers, songwriters, and composers—has accused a car repair chain [Digg Main]

Splunk 3.1: A search engine that indexes all your servers logs, scripts, code and message traps

I had the chance to try Splunk out about 3 months ago. The software was rather easy to install, however one thing that did seem to a little hard to use was the interface and the general working with inputs for the software. The search function was really neat, and easy to find errors that were occurring. The free version is limited but still usable, in a larger environment this product would probably be a life saver. Single server deployments, not so much.

Brewery offers lifetime supply of beer in return for stolen laptop

A brewery in New Zealand is offering a lifetime supply of beer, in return for a laptop that was stolen from the Croucher Brewing Company in Rotorua New Zealand. Typically if something is stolen, the theft will usually use it or sell it. Everyone has been approached with an offer to buy a new laptop for cheap, and you know in the back of your head that its stolen. But in this case would you be seen as the bad guy for buying the stolen laptop, or the good guy for returning it for the free lifetime supply of beer?