Canada’s Copyright Board slaps tax on music downloads

If you buy a song off iTunes, you’ll be paying a 3 cents for each song in tax. Then new tax is to compensate artists for the reproduction of their songs. Vito Pilieci, CanWest News Service Published: Friday, October 19, 2007 OTTAWA — The Copyright Board of Canada has approved new taxes on digital MP3 music files – at least for files that are downloaded legally.

If you buy a song off iTunes, you’ll be paying a 3 cents for each song in tax. Then new tax is to compensate artists for the reproduction of their songs.

Vito Pilieci, CanWest News Service
Published: Friday, October 19, 2007

OTTAWA — The Copyright Board of Canada has approved new taxes on digital MP3 music files – at least for files that are downloaded legally.

The tariffs, to be charged to iTunes and other companies that distribute music over the Internet, adds three cents to the cost of individual songs that now sell for about 99 cents, and 1.5 cents per track for downloaded albums.

Meant to compensate artists for the reproduction of their songs, the charges follow similar levies that add 21 cents to the price of every blank CD sold in Canada. And they are retroactive to 1996, when Canada’s music industry first began pushing for tariffs on transmitted music files.

Read full article on canada.com

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Boeing’s unmanned A160T Hummingbird helicopter takes flight

Not the first Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) made. But the Boeing A160HT Humming Bird should be one of the best once further tests and simulation in combat missions is completed.
Boeing's unmanned A160T Hummingbird helicopter takes flight -

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It's been a few ticks since we've seen Boeing send an atypical aircraft into the friendly skies, but the firm's latest helicopter has successfully completed a 12-minute test flight without so much as a pilot on board. The A160T Hummingbird unmanned rotorcraft is a turbine-powered "warfighter" that aims to provide "intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance coverage" in locales that could make even the most calloused veteran queasy. During its time in the air, it reportedly met every objective set for it, and while we've no idea how soon this thing will be lifting itself up, it'll eventually reach speeds of up to 140 knots and stay airborne for up to 20 hours before returning to base for a pat on the wing.

[Via The Raw Feed, image courtesy of SkyControl]

 

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

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QuickPwn Release Allows Fast Jailbreak Of iPhone Firmware Update 2.0.2

That's right, hot off the blog presses QuickPwn has been updated by the iphone-dev.org team and now allows you to Jailbreak your iPhones 2.0.2 firmware. The new 2.0.2 firmware that was released on Monday supposedly fixes some "bugs", however the bugs aren't mentioned anywhere.
Here is the updated QuickPwn for Windows, wrapped by Poorlad’s GUI. It contains our new bundles for 2.0.2 and we’ve added support for version 2.0 devices which means you can QuickPwn and jailbreak the device if it is running 2.0, 2.0.1 or 2.0.2. Remember this is still beta software, so usual rules apply, no complaints ifanything goes wrong and use the tool at at your own risk! Download here! SHA1 = 8e1ed2ce9e7e473d38a9dc7824a384a9ac34d7d0

Read the full article at blog.iphone-dev.org
Download the new QuickPwn 1.2.0 with the new 2.0.2 bundle.

Thanks for another successful Jailbreak!

US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar

US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar - The New York Times is reporting on preparations in the works by the US government to prep for a 'cyberwar'. Precautionary measures are being taken to guard against concerted attacks by politically-minded (or well-paid) hackers looking to cause havoc. Though they outline scenarios where mass damage is the desired outcome (such as remotely opening a dam's gates to flood cities), most expect such conflicts to be more subtle. Parts of the internet, for example, may be unreachable or unreliable for certain countries. Regardless, the article suggests we've already seen our first low-level cyberwar in Estonia: "The cyberattacks in Estonia were apparently sparked by tensions over the country's plan to remove Soviet-era war memorials. Estonian officials initially blamed Russia for the attacks, suggesting that its state-run computer networks blocked online access to banks and government offices. The Kremlin denied the accusations. And Estonian officials ultimately accepted the idea that perhaps this attack was the work of tech-savvy activists, or 'hactivists,' who have been mounting similar attacks against just about everyone for several years."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]