Comcast traffic blocking: even more apps, groupware clients affected

More information about the supposed filters that Comcast has implemented to curb Bittorrent traffic on its network. Only now it looks as though the appplication suit Lotus Notes is affected. Last week, we reported on mounting evidence that Comcast is targeting and disrupting BitTorrent traffic on its network. Further digging by interested parties has turned up more indication that BitTorrent isn’t the only popular P2P protocol being tampered with by the United States’ largest ISP.

More information about the supposed filters that Comcast has implemented to curb Bittorrent traffic on its network. Only now it looks as though the appplication suit Lotus Notes is affected.

Last week, we reported on mounting evidence that Comcast is targeting and disrupting BitTorrent traffic on its network. Further digging by interested parties has turned up more indication that BitTorrent isn’t the only popular P2P protocol being tampered with by the United States’ largest ISP.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation noticed the same sort of packet forging that the AP did (and that Broadband Reports readers did some time ago), and continued its testing to see if other applications are affected. The answer is a disturbing “yes.” The results of additional testing done by the EFF indicate Comcast is sending forged reset packets with some Gnutella traffic. When the EFF ran a Gnutella node on a Comcast connection, the forged reset packets disrupted communication between the nodes.

Read the full article at arstechnica.com

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