Inside Nvidia’s Testing Facilities

Here’s an article from FiringSquad about their trip inside NVIDIA’s Santa Clara campus, which houses many labs and their massive group of grid computers. Good read, images included! NVIDIA releases a new product, on average, every 6 months. Sometimes sooner, sometimes later. But what goes on behind the scenes to make this happen? Earlier this week, we had the opportunity to find out exactly what happens behind NVIDIA’s closed doors. We were given almost unrestricted access to NVIDIA’s many labs and their high-performance computing center; what we saw was impressive. We were essentially given unfiltered access to see and talk with the people at NVIDIA. The engineers did not have to turn off their monitors when we walked into their labs. We were simply asked to black out any parts of the image that could reveal confidential information. Read More

Here’s an article from FiringSquad about their trip inside NVIDIA’s Santa Clara campus, which houses many labs and their massive group of grid computers. Good read, images included!

NVIDIA releases a new product, on average, every 6 months. Sometimes sooner, sometimes later. But what goes on behind the scenes to make this happen? Earlier this week, we had the opportunity to find out exactly what happens behind NVIDIA’s closed doors. We were given almost unrestricted access to NVIDIA’s many labs and their high-performance computing center; what we saw was impressive.

We were essentially given unfiltered access to see and talk with the people at NVIDIA. The engineers did not have to turn off their monitors when we walked into their labs. We were simply asked to black out any parts of the image that could reveal confidential information.

Read More

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Splunk 3.1: A search engine that indexes all your servers logs, scripts, code and message traps

I had the chance to try Splunk out about 3 months ago. The software was rather easy to install, however one thing that did seem to a little hard to use was the interface and the general working with inputs for the software. The search function was really neat, and easy to find errors that were occurring. The free version is limited but still usable, in a larger environment this product would probably be a life saver. Single server deployments, not so much.

Man sues over red-light cameras for $3 million

These similar camera's were installed in the lower mainland. They also had photo radar, which was absolutely insane. They got rid of it a year later.
Man sues over red-light cameras for $3 million -

Filed under: ,

David A. Czech is crazy upset about tickets, so he's suing the city of Northwood, Ohio, its police department, and an Arizona-based maker of red-light cameras (which automatically snap photos of traffic violations). The suit alleges that the cameras are part of an "unconstitutional ordinance to extort money" put in place by the city, and Mr. Czech (on behalf of himself and 20,000 other "offenders") is asking for a $3 million payback and an injunction barring use of the cameras. This isn't the first case of its kind that we've seen -- and it undoubtedly won't be the last, considering the recent spate of these systems being utilized across the nation.

[Thanks, Simon]

 

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

[EnGadget]

Drupal Day 1

So, this is what Day 1 is like. I have a nice theme that I got off the main Drupal site. As you can see its sleep and colorful but not overwhelming. Aside from messing with the general configuration of Drupal, there is a lot more you need to do to make it even remotely functional/organized. Lets take categories for instance. At first I didn't know exactly how these worked. However after some playing around, and further posting. I was able to separate my blog entries and the HOWTO's. I just create a new Category for each, and then provide terms to place them under which is a great feature.

Network Solutions (NSI) is registering every domain name checked throug their WHOIS

I always thought there was something really strange about the WHOIS searches done at Registrars. Specifically the searches would have to be done on their website, a normal "whois" lookup through Linux wouldn't show up registered the next day.
A story is developing regarding domain name registrar Network Solutions front running domains. According to multiple sources on DomainState.com, it appears that domains searched via NSI are being purchased by the registrar thereby preventing a registrant from purchasing it at any other registrar other than NSI. As an example, a random domain which DNN searches such as HowDoesThisDomainTasteTaste.com can be seen in this whois search to now be unavailable to register at other registrars but at NSI it can be purchased
Full article at domainnamenews.com