Protect your MediaWiki from anonymous users.

After searching for some time on an easy way to protect an internal wiki. I found the following article useful. It goes in-depth into what you would need to change on a base MediaWiki configuration to only allow registered users to see the content within the Wiki. After following all the steps I know am able to login to my private Wiki over SSL! Thus allowing me to keep all my private and important notes online!

After searching for some time on an easy way to protect an internal wiki. I found the following article useful. It goes in-depth into what you would need to change on a base MediaWiki configuration to only allow registered users to see the content within the Wiki. After following all the steps I know am able to login to my private Wiki over SSL! Thus allowing me to keep all my private and important notes online!

I’ve been using an amalgamation of hacks to track all the information I want to be able to recall later: del.icio.us for bookmarks, gmail for contacts and random notes, private blog entries for some organized content, and tracks for tracking projects. Blech. It’s just too much. My memory is too weak. What I really want is a comprehensive PIM (Personal Informatio Manager). And so I installed MediaWiki because that’s what Wikipedia uses and that’s what Dreamhost offers as a One-Click Install (e.g. the path of least resistance).

I thought I’d share with you all the the process of customizing the default install to create a private wiki. Following are the specifics to my install but this will probably be helpful to many with a different host or newer version.

Read the full article at 23rdworld.com

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