Goverment Employee uses On Call IT firm to destroy Goverment data

A Goverment Employee used an On Call IT service to perform a "seven level" format on his hard drive that possibly contained federal evidence. Scott Bloch runs the Office of Special Counsel, an agency charged with protecting government whistleblowers and enforcing a ban on federal employees engaging in partisan political activity.

A Goverment Employee used an On Call IT service to perform a "seven level" format on his hard drive that possibly contained federal evidence.

Scott Bloch runs the Office of Special Counsel, an agency charged with protecting government whistleblowers and enforcing a ban on federal employees engaging in partisan political activity.

At the same time, Mr. Bloch has himself been under investigation since 2005. At the direction of the White House, the federal Office of Personnel Management’s inspector general is looking into claims that Mr. Bloch improperly retaliated against employees and dismissed whistleblower cases without adequate examination.

Recently, investigators learned that Mr. Bloch erased all the files on his office personal computer late last year. They are now trying to determine whether the deletions were improper or part of a cover-up, lawyers close to the case said.

Bypassing his agency’s computer technicians, Mr. Bloch phoned 1-800-905-GEEKS for Geeks on Call, the mobile PC-help service. It dispatched a technician in one of its signature PT Cruiser wagons. In an interview, the 49-year-old former labor-law litigator from Lawrence, Kan., confirmed that he contacted Geeks on Call but said he was trying to eradicate a virus that had seized control of his computer.

Clay Johnson, the White House official overseeing the Office of Personnel Management’s inquiry into Mr. Bloch, declined to comment. Depending on circumstances, erasing files or destroying evidence in a federal investigation can be considered obstruction of justice.

Mr. Bloch had his computer’s hard disk completely cleansed using a "seven-level" wipe: a thorough scrubbing that conforms to Defense Department data-security standards. The process makes it nearly impossible for forensics experts to restore the data later. He also directed Geeks on Call to erase laptop computers that had been used by his two top political deputies, who had recently left the agency.

Geeks on Call visited Mr. Bloch’s government office in a nondescript office building on M Street in Washington twice, on Dec. 18 and Dec. 21, 2006, according to a receipt reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. The total charge was $1,149, paid with an agency credit card, the receipt shows. The receipt says a seven-level wipe was performed but doesn’t mention any computer virus.

Jeff Phelps, who runs Washington’s Geeks on Call franchise, declined to talk about specific clients, but said calls placed directly by government officials are unusual. He also said erasing a drive is an unusual virus treatment. "We don’t do a seven-level wipe for a virus," he said.

Why would you need to do a seven pass format ("U.S. Department of Defense recommendations to destroy data (DoD 5200.28-STD) : seven pass extended character rotation wiping. ") on a Personal Computer unless you were trying to remove something that no one could recover. Even the On Call IT person said it was highly unusual that a Goverment Agency contacted them and that they requested a seven pass format to meet DoD standards. If you have a Virus a simple format would take care of it and it wouldn’t cost over $1000 USD to have done. The in house IT would be able to complete this rather easily.
Read the full article at The Wall Street Journal

Read the full article at The Wall Street Journal
Download BCWipePD a free DoD seven pass wiping program


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