Exchange 2007: Finding out what version and service pack you’re running.

First  you will need to find out some information about Exchange, and the only way to do that is to open up the Exchange Management Shell and run the following:

Get-ExchangeServer | fl name,edition,admindisplayversion

Then you will be shown the following:

[PS] C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator.BCRICWH\Desktop>Get-ExchangeServer
| fl name,edition,admindisplayversion

Name                : EXCH01A
Edition             : Standard
AdminDisplayVersion : Version 8.1 (Build 240.6)

Name                : EXCH02A
Edition             : Standard
AdminDisplayVersion : Version 8.1 (Build 240.6)

Name                : EXCHMBX01
Edition             : Enterprise
AdminDisplayVersion : Version 8.1 (Build 240.6)

Name                : mx4
Edition             : Standard
AdminDisplayVersion : Version 8.1 (Build 240.6)

Name                : mx3
Edition             : Standard
AdminDisplayVersion : Version 8.1 (Build 240.6)

As you can see the Version isn’t really all that informative. But its rather simple, the 8 stands for Exchange 2007 and the 1 stands for Service Pack 1. The build will also confirm that this is SP1, however I’m assuming it only changes when there are hotfixes or rollup updates.
Anyways, you can get all the version and build numbers from Microsoft at the following URL.
I am also going to copy and paste them here for historical purposes.
Exchange Server 4.0 4.0.837 April 1996
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 (a) 4.0.993 August 1996
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 SP1 4.0.838 May 1996
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 SP2 4.0.993 August 1996
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 SP3 4.0.994 November 1996
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 SP4 4.0.995 April 1997
Microsoft Exchange Server 4.0 SP5 4.0.996 May 1998
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.0 5.0.1457 March 1997
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.0 SP1 5.0.1458 June 1997
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.0 SP2 5.0.1460 February 1998
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 5.5.1960 November 1997
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 SP1 5.5.2232 July 1998
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 SP2 5.5.2448 December 1998
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 SP3 5.5.2650 September 1999
Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 SP4 5.5.2653 November 2000
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 6.0.4417 October 2000
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server (a) 6.0.4417 January 2001
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server SP1 6.0.4712 July 2001
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server SP2 6.0.5762 December 2001
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server SP3 6.0.6249 August 2002
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server post-SP3 6.0.6487 September 2003
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server post-SP3 6.0.6556 April 2004
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server post-SP3 6.0.6603 August 2004
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server post-SP3 6.0.6620.5 March 2008
Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server post-SP3 6.0.6620.7 August 2008
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 6.5.6944 October 2003 Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 SP1 6.5.7226 May 2004
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 SP2 6.5.7638 October 2005
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 post-SP2 6.5.7653.33 March 2008
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 post-SP2 6.5.7654.4 August 2008
Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 8.0.685.24 or 8.0.685.25 December 2006
Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 SP1 8.1.0240.006 November 2007
Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 SP2 8.2.0176.002 August 2009
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 14.00.0639.021 October 2009
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