Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker

Almost like a RTCW Malware Camp. Would be interesting to see what the bunker looks like. Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker – Symantec has emerged from its bunker in the British countryside, moving its malware-fighting operations from a former U.K. military nuclear shelter to a more conventional office in Reading. The nuclear bunker, with concrete walls and an obscure entrance on a hillside near Twyford, England, was used for one of the company’s Special Operations Center (SOC). The regional centers are used by security analysts who are part of the company’s Managed Security Services. Companies hire Symantec to help with part or all of their IT security operations. The nuclear shelter may have been good public relations for a security company, but it wasn’t comfortable: It lacked windows and had “sanitation” problems, company officials said. On Wednesday, Symantec offered a tour of its new facility in Reading to journalists, analysts, and customers. The facility, formerly used by storage company Veritas, which Symantec acquired in 2005, has twice as much space as the bunker and was needed to accommodate Symantec’s growth. View: The full story News source: Infoworld Read full story… [NeoWin-Main]

Almost like a RTCW Malware Camp. Would be interesting to see what the bunker looks like.

Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunkerSymantec has emerged from its bunker in the British countryside, moving its malware-fighting operations from a former U.K. military nuclear shelter to a more conventional office in Reading. The nuclear bunker, with concrete walls and an obscure entrance on a hillside near Twyford, England, was used for one of the company’s Special Operations Center (SOC). The regional centers are used by security analysts who are part of the company’s Managed Security Services. Companies hire Symantec to help with part or all of their IT security operations.

The nuclear shelter may have been good public relations for a security company, but it wasn’t comfortable: It lacked windows and had “sanitation” problems, company officials said. On Wednesday, Symantec offered a tour of its new facility in Reading to journalists, analysts, and customers. The facility, formerly used by storage company Veritas, which Symantec acquired in 2005, has twice as much space as the bunker and was needed to accommodate Symantec’s growth.

View: The full story
News source: Infoworld

Read full story…

[NeoWin-Main]

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