Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) HDD review

I just picked up a SATAII 500G drive that went for $130CAD, Western Digital. Hitachi use to make drives for IBM, if you ever remember the DeathStar’s. It seems that someone forgot to put in some logic within the drive, and have the drive park its heads during idle. It never did this and eventually the heads got so dirty they would scratch the disk. This has all been fixed now, but its a blast from the past when you see “DeskStar” popping up. I remember losing quite a bit of data that summer. I did however recover some by putting the drive in the freezer. 😀 Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) HDD review – The terabyte race for consumer desktop hard drives has been on for a long time, now the first generation of drives is here. On April 25th, Hitachi announced that it would begin shipping the Deskstar 7K1000, their latest series of consumer hard drives, weighting in at 750GB and a monstrous 1000GB (1TB). The 1TB version which we are reviewing today is slated at $399, a serious price tag for this colossal amount of storage. The Deskstar 7K1000 represents a milestone for Hitachi and for the hard drive industry as a whole, as it is the first drive to offer a 1 terabyte capacity. However, Hitachi has not simply grabbed five 200GB platters and stuck them together to create a 1TB hard drive. Rather, there is much more to the Deskstar 7K1000, such as its Serial ATA II interface and the massive 32MB memory buffer. This is also the first desktop Hitachi drive to feature PMR technology (Perpendicular Magnetic Recording). View: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) Hard Drive @ TechSpot Read full story… [NeoWin-Main]

I just picked up a SATAII 500G drive that went for $130CAD, Western Digital. Hitachi use to make drives for IBM, if you ever remember the DeathStar’s. It seems that someone forgot to put in some logic within the drive, and have the drive park its heads during idle. It never did this and eventually the heads got so dirty they would scratch the disk. This has all been fixed now, but its a blast from the past when you see “DeskStar” popping up. I remember losing quite a bit of data that summer. I did however recover some by putting the drive in the freezer. 😀

Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) HDD reviewThe terabyte race for consumer desktop hard drives has been on for a long time, now the first generation of drives is here. On April 25th, Hitachi announced that it would begin shipping the Deskstar 7K1000, their latest series of consumer hard drives, weighting in at 750GB and a monstrous 1000GB (1TB). The 1TB version which we are reviewing today is slated at $399, a serious price tag for this colossal amount of storage.

The Deskstar 7K1000 represents a milestone for Hitachi and for the hard drive industry as a whole, as it is the first drive to offer a 1 terabyte capacity. However, Hitachi has not simply grabbed five 200GB platters and stuck them together to create a 1TB hard drive. Rather, there is much more to the Deskstar 7K1000, such as its Serial ATA II interface and the massive 32MB memory buffer. This is also the first desktop Hitachi drive to feature PMR technology (Perpendicular Magnetic Recording).

View: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000 (1 Terabyte) Hard Drive @ TechSpot

Read full story…

[NeoWin-Main]

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Plans for Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) revealed

Another Ubuntu Release in the works!
To give you the rundown on the notable changes. The desktop version will be shipping with a new default windows manager that looks kinda like Mac OSX:


We are aiming for Ubuntu to be one of the first distributions to ship
the newly merged Compiz and Beryl projects (compcomm/OpenCompositing);
and enable it as the default window manager on systems with a supported
combination of hardware and drivers.



http://compiz.org


cube effect peel effect cube effect cube effect


And the addition of AppArmour to the Server version of Ubuntu:




For increased security, the AppArmor security framework will be
available as an option for those that want it.

The following is the original statement by the Ubuntu Development Manager.


Now that the set of feature goals planned for Ubuntu 7.10 ("Gutsy
Gibbon") has been largely finalised, it seems like an appropriate point
to announce the plan to the world.
While this is based on the approved blueprints for gutsy[0], which are
expected to be implemented in time, we do release according to a
time-based schedule[1] rather than a feature-based one. It is not
unusual for some planned features to be delayed to later releases;
happily it is also not unusual for our developers to introduce neat
features we weren't expecting either.
[0] https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/gutsy/
[1] https://wiki.ubuntu.com/GutsyReleaseSchedule
Desktop
-------
Ubuntu 7.10 will ship with the latest edition of the GNOME desktop,
2.20, released a few weeks before our own release. Kubuntu 7.10 will
ship with KDE 3.5.7, and should also include packages of KDE 4.0 rc 2
available for optional side-by-side installation.
We are aiming for Ubuntu to be one of the first distributions to ship
the newly merged Compiz and Beryl projects (compcomm/OpenCompositing);
and enable it as the default window manager on systems with a supported
combination of hardware and drivers.
Systems which do not support compositing, or those with it disabled by
user option, will use the existing metacity window manager.
Hardware Support
----------------
Ubuntu 7.10 will use the 2.6.22 Linux kernel, along with our usual
selection of updated and additional drivers.
We will also use Xorg 7.3, giving better graphics hardware support and
the option of hotplugging monitors (RandR 1.2) and input devices
(xserver 1.4).
As well as the easier configuration for hotplugging-supported drivers
("no xorg.conf"), we also aim to have better configuration for other
drivers and fallback settings for when there is a problem.
Some "winmodem" chips will be supported out of the box, where drivers
are available; though this may rely on the use of restricted drivers.
Improvements to the Restricted Driver Manager are expected, allowing
drivers to be disabled by default and proposed by the manager. As
previously announced, an edition of Ubuntu without restricted enabled by
default is in the works.
Mobile
------
As announced, Ubuntu 7.10 will be first release to include a new Mobile
and Embedded edition targeted at hand-held devices and other
mobile/embedded form factors.
This integrates the Hildon UI components developed by Nokia into Ubuntu,
on top of the existing Ubuntu platform.
Server
------
Development of the Ubuntu 7.10 Server Edition has received a new boost
with a dedicated development team at Canonical working on it. Features
aiming to improve the experience for new and hobbyist administrators are
expected, as well as features desirable for small businesses and
organisations.
For increased security, the AppArmor security framework will be
available as an option for those that want it.
Stability and Performance
-------------------------
Ubuntu 7.10 should function significantly better when the filesystem is
full or otherwise not writable, allowing the user to make room and then
continue working without undue interruption.
Improvements to our "apport" bug and crash reporting infrastructure are
planned, in particular integration with our software installation and
upgrade tools so that problems installing or upgrading packages can be
easily reported with relevant information attached. Kernel crashes will
also be intercepted on reboot, and may be reported using the tool.
Our efforts to improve boot reliability and performance continue;
unlimited and reliable stackability of software raid (MD) devices, LVM
volumes and software-managed (devmapper) devices will be supported with
no runtime ordering issues.
Ubuntu 7.10 will ship with Upstart 0.5, which will provide flexible and
reliable service supervision. We expect to harness this for suitable
core services, and some boot process tasks, as appropriate.
Scott
--
Scott James Remnant
Ubuntu Development Manager
scott at ubuntu.com
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