Final Draft of GPLv3 Allows Novell-Microsoft Deal

Final Draft of GPLv3 Allows Novell-Microsoft Deal – famicommie writes “All of Novell’s fingernail biting has been for naught. In a display of forgiveness and bridge building on behalf of the FSF, ZDNet reports that the final draft of the GPLv3 will close the infamous MS-Novell loophole while allowing deals made previously to continue. From the article: ‘The final, last-call GPLv3 draft bans only future deals for what it described as tactical reasons in a 32-page explanation of changes. That means Novell doesn’t have to worry about distributing software in SLES that’s governed by the GPLv3 … Drafting the new license has been a fractious process, but Eben Moglen, the Columbia University law school professor who has led much of the effort, believes consensus is forming. That agreement is particularly important in the open-source realm, where differing license requirements can erect barriers between different open-source projects.'” Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]
Final Draft of GPLv3 Allows Novell-Microsoft Dealfamicommie writes “All of Novell’s fingernail biting has been for naught. In a display of forgiveness and bridge building on behalf of the FSF, ZDNet reports that the final draft of the GPLv3 will close the infamous MS-Novell loophole while allowing deals made previously to continue. From the article: ‘The final, last-call GPLv3 draft bans only future deals for what it described as tactical reasons in a 32-page explanation of changes. That means Novell doesn’t have to worry about distributing software in SLES that’s governed by the GPLv3 … Drafting the new license has been a fractious process, but Eben Moglen, the Columbia University law school professor who has led much of the effort, believes consensus is forming. That agreement is particularly important in the open-source realm, where differing license requirements can erect barriers between different open-source projects.'”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]


Did you like this article?


0 Shares:
You May Also Like

Are Network Carriers To Blame For iPhone 3G Problems

I was recently having issues with my phone not being able to use 3G, and I thought it might have been a firmware or possibly hardware issue. But after troubleshooting for some time, I found that it was in fact applications crashing or firmware bugs. Hearing more and more reports of network issues with 3G and iPhones, Wired Magazine decided to do a survey of 3G coverage across america.

24-hour Test Drive of PC-BSD

My original colocation machine was FreeBSD 4.2 and it was fun to play with. The package system was great, you could either compile or install pre-compiled versions. However, when you upgrade and leave compiled/pre-compiled packages dormant. They can come back to bit you in the ass with dependency issues and the package database breaking. I'm glad someone is making an effort to make it more user friendly, although I don't run BSD I love a lot of its features. 24-hour Test Drive of PC-BSD - An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica has a concise introduction to PC-BSD, a FreeBSD derivative that emphasizes ease of use and aims to convert Windows users. The review describes the installation process, articulates the advantages of PC-BSD,and reveal some of the challenges that the reviewer faced along the way. From the article: 'In the end, I would suggest this distribution to new users provided they had someone to call in case of a driver malfunction during installation. I would also recommend PC-BSD to seasoned Unix users that have never tried using FreeBSD before and would prefer a shallower learning curve before getting down to business.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

Dell Refuses to Sell Ubuntu to Business

Dell has only been offering Ubuntu for over a month now. I haven't heard all that much in regards to their Support, I wonder if Microsoft is giving dell $$ to not Support Ubuntu on computers sold for Home Office/Business purposes?
Dell Refuses to Sell Ubuntu to Business - An anonymous reader writes "I had a surreal experience with Dell today. My boss asked me to order a new computer for our small, non-profit business. Wanting to support Dell in their decision to sell computers with Ubuntu installed, I decided to order one. First, I talked to a small business representative, who informed me that I could not order one of the Ubuntu-based computers through the small business department. I had to go through the "home and home office" department. I called the Home office department. I asked the representative if I could buy one of the ubuntu computers for my company. She said (and I quote), "these Dell computers are designed for personal use only, as long as you use it for personal use, you can purchase one." So I lied and said I would.... Next, I tried to buy it on our business credit card. They would have none of that. She told me that I had to buy it through a personal card. Now, as a non-profit, our business does not pay sales tax (10% in Tennessee). Had I bought it with my own card, I would have had to pay tax (~$90), which my company would not have reimbursed me for. So.....no Dell today."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]