P2P Remains Dominant Protocol

P2P Remains Dominant Protocol – An anonymous reader writes “Last week, a press release was issued by Ellacotya that suggested something quite startling — HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol, aka Web traffic) had for the first time in four years overtaken P2P traffic. However a new article from Slyck disputes this, and contends that P2P remains the bandwidth heavyweight.” Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]
P2P Remains Dominant ProtocolAn anonymous reader writes “Last week, a press release was issued by Ellacotya that suggested something quite startling — HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol, aka Web traffic) had for the first time in four years overtaken P2P traffic. However a new article from Slyck disputes this, and contends that P2P remains the bandwidth heavyweight.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]


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