CheckGmail 1.12 (Default branch)

CheckGmail 1.12 (Default branch) – CheckGmail is a system tray application that checks a Gmail account for new mail. It is fast, secure, and uses minimal bandwidth via the use of Atom feeds. License: GNU General Public License (GPL) Changes: This release adds information about attachments and clickable URIs in the message full text. Numerous bugs have been fixed, including the issues with XGL/Compiz, international character display, and multiple monitors. [FreshMeat]
CheckGmail 1.12 (Default branch)Screenshot
CheckGmail is a system tray application that checks a Gmail
account for new mail. It is fast, secure, and uses minimal
bandwidth via the use of Atom feeds.


License: GNU General Public License (GPL)


Changes:
This release adds information about attachments
and clickable URIs in the message full text.
Numerous bugs have been fixed, including the
issues with XGL/Compiz, international character
display, and multiple monitors.

[FreshMeat]

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