It All Comes Together: Laptop roundup

It All Comes Together: Laptop roundup – Secure your laptop with the LaptopLock“Don’t let the creep who stole your computer paw through your private files, passwords and personal information.” Turn a t-shirt into a keyboard cover“Great for saving your lappie’s screen from keyboard scratches with an old or free tee, this project requires only a bit of cutting, ironing and sewing.” Stuff We Like: Laptop CushTop“Man, there’s nothing worse than frying your thighs with a hot laptop in the middle of some very important web surfing.” DIY magnetic power connector“If you’re familiar with the MagSafe magnetic connectors on the new MacBooks, this is a DIY version for Thinkpads.” Use your laptop as a giant clock“To always end your presentation on time without glancing at your watch (a gesture that communicates to the audience that you can’t wait to finish and leave), place a laptop on the floor in front of where you’re speaking, and set it up to display a giant clock.” Make your own laptop stand“I’ve always liked the iLap laptop stands, but I’ve never been able to justify the price…” Laptop Troubleshooting Tip: Re-seat your RAM“…the moral of the story might save you a trip to the computer hospital..” Video demonstration: Fix your wine-soaked laptop“Save your laptop from the heartbreak of liquid spills.” MacGyver Tip: Silence your laptop with snipped headphones“Repurpose those old crappy earphones into a laptop silencer.” How to secure your laptop for air travelPack laptops with soft foam or bubble wrap and place laptop bags inside other luggage to protect them from rough handling and to keep them inconspicuous.” Use your cell phone as a modem“You’re stuck with the laptop in the land of no Internet, but you’ve got unlimited minutes or a great data plan on your cell phone.” [LifeHacker]
It All Comes Together: Laptop roundup

[LifeHacker]

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24-hour Test Drive of PC-BSD

My original colocation machine was FreeBSD 4.2 and it was fun to play with. The package system was great, you could either compile or install pre-compiled versions. However, when you upgrade and leave compiled/pre-compiled packages dormant. They can come back to bit you in the ass with dependency issues and the package database breaking. I'm glad someone is making an effort to make it more user friendly, although I don't run BSD I love a lot of its features. 24-hour Test Drive of PC-BSD - An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica has a concise introduction to PC-BSD, a FreeBSD derivative that emphasizes ease of use and aims to convert Windows users. The review describes the installation process, articulates the advantages of PC-BSD,and reveal some of the challenges that the reviewer faced along the way. From the article: 'In the end, I would suggest this distribution to new users provided they had someone to call in case of a driver malfunction during installation. I would also recommend PC-BSD to seasoned Unix users that have never tried using FreeBSD before and would prefer a shallower learning curve before getting down to business.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

JVC designs tiny 4k D-ILA chip

JVC designs tiny 4k D-ILA chip -

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JVC 1.27-inch 4K2K D-ILA chipJVC announced at InfoComm 2007 a 1.27-inch 4K2K D-ILA chip for use in projectors that offer up more than four times high-definition resolution. Intended initially for medical, modeling, and simulation use, the chip can produce a ten-megapixel 4096x2400 pixel image with a 20,000:1 contrast ratio. While DLP-based 4K projectors are currently in use in some digital cinemas, the JVC chip will be used in D-ILA, a variant of LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon), and has a higher pixel density. Much like professional racing technologies trickle down to the average sedan on the street, the research that goes into 4K projectors can also make their way to HDTVs in the home, bringing smaller, higher-definition sets to a living room near you. We say bring on the quad-split-screen HD!

 

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

[EnGadget]

10 Really Useful Flickr Grease Monkey Userscripts.

I'm sure a lot of people are familiar with the FireFox extension called GreaseMonkey. The extension allows you to manipulate the JavaScript present on any website you visit. For instance, if you want to displaying text is a specific way, you can. You can also change the colour or look of site with your own custom JavaScript.
9. Flickr Follow Comments - This useful script helps you to view images that you have commented on - but only those that interest you. If you are writing lots of comments every day you know how hard it is not to get distracted by the overload of images when you click “Comments You’ve made”. With this userscript you have 4 different options to see only certain types of comments.

Iran.com sold for $400,000

I got this link from a friend over MSN, interesting read, almost over a million dollars spent on domains.

Rick Latona of DigiPawn.com went on a spending spree this week and more than half a million dollars later he was the proud new owner of Iran.com ($400,000), TrackAndField.com ($57,000), Territory.com ($30,000) and Gutter.com ($12,500). The first three names all landed on the top half of our new Top 20 chart and Gutter.com just missed making the Big Board. All four names were acquired in private transactions. In addition to being the biggest sale reported this week, Iran.com is the 6th biggest sale reported so far in 2007.




You can read the full article here at http://www.dnjournal.com