US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar

US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar – The New York Times is reporting on preparations in the works by the US government to prep for a ‘cyberwar’. Precautionary measures are being taken to guard against concerted attacks by politically-minded (or well-paid) hackers looking to cause havoc. Though they outline scenarios where mass damage is the desired outcome (such as remotely opening a dam’s gates to flood cities), most expect such conflicts to be more subtle. Parts of the internet, for example, may be unreachable or unreliable for certain countries. Regardless, the article suggests we’ve already seen our first low-level cyberwar in Estonia: “The cyberattacks in Estonia were apparently sparked by tensions over the country’s plan to remove Soviet-era war memorials. Estonian officials initially blamed Russia for the attacks, suggesting that its state-run computer networks blocked online access to banks and government offices. The Kremlin denied the accusations. And Estonian officials ultimately accepted the idea that perhaps this attack was the work of tech-savvy activists, or ‘hactivists,’ who have been mounting similar attacks against just about everyone for several years.” Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]
US Prepares for Eventual CyberwarThe New York Times is reporting on preparations in the works by the US government to prep for a ‘cyberwar’. Precautionary measures are being taken to guard against concerted attacks by politically-minded (or well-paid) hackers looking to cause havoc. Though they outline scenarios where mass damage is the desired outcome (such as remotely opening a dam’s gates to flood cities), most expect such conflicts to be more subtle. Parts of the internet, for example, may be unreachable or unreliable for certain countries. Regardless, the article suggests we’ve already seen our first low-level cyberwar in Estonia: “The cyberattacks in Estonia were apparently sparked by tensions over the country’s plan to remove Soviet-era war memorials. Estonian officials initially blamed Russia for the attacks, suggesting that its state-run computer networks blocked online access to banks and government offices. The Kremlin denied the accusations. And Estonian officials ultimately accepted the idea that perhaps this attack was the work of tech-savvy activists, or ‘hactivists,’ who have been mounting similar attacks against just about everyone for several years.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

0 Shares:
You May Also Like

What happened to Apple Customer Service?

A nice little article about how Apples growth is affecting its customers, is Apple short changing all of its loyal customers, fans and newly won over customers by looking more for profit rather than customer satisfaction?

Western Digital developing 20,000RPM drives

That's right, this isn't a joke.
The new drive will be very similar to the recently-released VelociRaptor, in that it’ll be a 2.5in drive with a custom 3.5in housing built around it. Details are incredibly light at this stage, given that the product is still in development, and we don’t even have a release timeframe at the moment. However, our sources said that the drive will be ‘silent’ – that’s the last thing I would have expected from a drive with platters spinning at 20,000 RPM. Western Digital is apparently working on silencing the beast by improving the housing technology, which will now not just act as a heatsink, but also as a noise cancelling device. We’d also hope that the drive enclosure has some vibration dampening technology as well, because that’s also likely to be a problem given the high spindle speeds.
Now they just need push SATA 6.0Gbit/s onto motherboards http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SATA#SATA_6.0_Gbit.2Fs Full artile at bit-tech.net

Screenshot Tour: Customize Windows XP with TweakUI

LifeHacker Has a walk through of how to customize Microsoft Windows XP with Tweak UI, with included screen shots.
Customize Windows XP with TweakUI - One of the best tools for fine-tuning Windows XP is the free TweakUI PowerToy utility from Microsoft. TweakUI digs deep into Windows' settings and can customize its behavior dozens of ways, from how many icons appear on the Alt-Tab dialog to Explorer context menu choices to what your program shortcuts look like. TweakUI's been around forever and we've mentioned it here and there throughout the years at Lifehacker, but it's high time we gave it the full walk-through it deserves. After the jump, take a gander at 15 useful adjustments you can make to your XP system with TweakUI.