US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar

US Prepares for Eventual Cyberwar – The New York Times is reporting on preparations in the works by the US government to prep for a ‘cyberwar’. Precautionary measures are being taken to guard against concerted attacks by politically-minded (or well-paid) hackers looking to cause havoc. Though they outline scenarios where mass damage is the desired outcome (such as remotely opening a dam’s gates to flood cities), most expect such conflicts to be more subtle. Parts of the internet, for example, may be unreachable or unreliable for certain countries. Regardless, the article suggests we’ve already seen our first low-level cyberwar in Estonia: “The cyberattacks in Estonia were apparently sparked by tensions over the country’s plan to remove Soviet-era war memorials. Estonian officials initially blamed Russia for the attacks, suggesting that its state-run computer networks blocked online access to banks and government offices. The Kremlin denied the accusations. And Estonian officials ultimately accepted the idea that perhaps this attack was the work of tech-savvy activists, or ‘hactivists,’ who have been mounting similar attacks against just about everyone for several years.” Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]
US Prepares for Eventual CyberwarThe New York Times is reporting on preparations in the works by the US government to prep for a ‘cyberwar’. Precautionary measures are being taken to guard against concerted attacks by politically-minded (or well-paid) hackers looking to cause havoc. Though they outline scenarios where mass damage is the desired outcome (such as remotely opening a dam’s gates to flood cities), most expect such conflicts to be more subtle. Parts of the internet, for example, may be unreachable or unreliable for certain countries. Regardless, the article suggests we’ve already seen our first low-level cyberwar in Estonia: “The cyberattacks in Estonia were apparently sparked by tensions over the country’s plan to remove Soviet-era war memorials. Estonian officials initially blamed Russia for the attacks, suggesting that its state-run computer networks blocked online access to banks and government offices. The Kremlin denied the accusations. And Estonian officials ultimately accepted the idea that perhaps this attack was the work of tech-savvy activists, or ‘hactivists,’ who have been mounting similar attacks against just about everyone for several years.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]

0 Shares:
You May Also Like

LG to supply TV converters for US government program

Very interesting, no more analog TV channles. I wonder if Canada will follow suit.
LG to supply TV converters for US government program - For some, February 17, 2009 is going to be a frustrating day, as it marks the end of the line for American analog television broadcasts. Those with old-school wood-paneled TVs are going to either need to go out and buy a new set or purchase a converter box to be able to view the new digital channels. If I wasn’t already gadget-obsessed, I’d be mad as hell if someone forced me to upgrade my TV and I’d be even more furious once I found out how much it was going to cost me. Luckily, your trusty National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)has a solution.

Seagate unveils turmoil-proof EE25.2 hard drive

Seagate unveils turmoil-proof EE25.2 hard drive - As if stuffing a quarter terabyte onto a single Barracuda platter and finally matching Hitachi in the 1TB realm weren't enough to gloat about, Seagate is now unveiling a hard drive aimed squarely at those reading this from the Amazon Rainforest (or a vanilla construction area, but you understand). The second-generation SATA EE25 drive -- easily dubbed the EE25.2 -- is available in sizes up to 80GB and can handle extreme temperatures, sensational heights, 'round the clock operation, 90-percent humidity, and drops / shocks that would likely put you out of commission before your data. No word yet on pricing nor availability, but don't expect 80 gigabytes of nearly indestructible storage to come without a premium.

 

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

[EnGadget]

Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker

Almost like a RTCW Malware Camp. Would be interesting to see what the bunker looks like.
Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker - Symantec has emerged from its bunker in the British countryside, moving its malware-fighting operations from a former U.K. military nuclear shelter to a more conventional office in Reading. The nuclear bunker, with concrete walls and an obscure entrance on a hillside near Twyford, England, was used for one of the company's Special Operations Center (SOC). The regional centers are used by security analysts who are part of the company's Managed Security Services. Companies hire Symantec to help with part or all of their IT security operations.

The nuclear shelter may have been good public relations for a security company, but it wasn't comfortable: It lacked windows and had "sanitation" problems, company officials said. On Wednesday, Symantec offered a tour of its new facility in Reading to journalists, analysts, and customers. The facility, formerly used by storage company Veritas, which Symantec acquired in 2005, has twice as much space as the bunker and was needed to accommodate Symantec's growth.

View: The full story
News source: Infoworld

Read full story...

[NeoWin-Main]