10 Ways To Speed Up Digg

Have you found Digg slow during the peak hours? Well peertopress.com has a top 10 for Kevin Rose on how to speed up Digg. The article was put on Digg’s front page, and the comments left on peertopress.com website are pretty hilarious.

Have you found Digg slow during the peak hours? Well peertopress.com has a top 10 for Kevin Rose on how to speed up Digg. The article was put on Digg’s front page, and the comments left on peertopress.com website are pretty hilarious.

1. Stop using apache
digg Although apache is great for websites with under 10 visitors per day, for a big site like digg it is the worst server software you can choose. Many sites with the same amount of traffic are using lighttpd. It is safe, easy to use and about 100 times faster then apache.

2. Get more servers
Most of the time more does not equal better, but I guess with the amount of money you guys are making, you can easily afford to buy some new hardware. This should help you guys to spread the load.

3. Enough with the 1000 javascript/css includes
Seriously, how many files does it take for only the main page to work? 15! Can you believe this? 15 files being included every time someone visits the main page. 1000 visitors equals 15000 extra requests on the server. What makes it even worst is that most of the javascript includes are not even compressed. Did you guys ever heard of mootools?

Read the full article on peertopress.com

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