DeviceAnywhere lets devs play with 500 phones over the net

DeviceAnywhere is a company that wires cellphone hardware into servers, which are then accessible over the internet. Mainly used by software developers and for cross platform development, instead of buying all the phones you can just rent them and use them over the internet. Talk about the ultimate iPhone hack. Mobile Complete, a software-services company, has pulled an iPhone to pieces and lashed it to a remote-controlled server. Every input and output on the dissected iPhone is electrically hooked up to the net, providing access to would-be iPhone programmers over the web.

DeviceAnywhere is a company that wires cellphone hardware into servers, which are then accessible over the internet. Mainly used by software developers and for cross platform development, instead of buying all the phones you can just rent them and use them over the internet.

Talk about the ultimate iPhone hack. Mobile Complete, a software-services company, has pulled an iPhone to pieces and lashed it to a remote-controlled server. Every input and output on the dissected iPhone is electrically hooked up to the net, providing access to would-be iPhone programmers over the web.

“It’s all occurring electrically on the handset,” says Faraz Syed, CEO of Mobile Complete. “They are surprisingly reliable and robust, even though they look like we’ve cut them open and killed them.”

The service, called DeviceAnywhere, offers about a thousand disassembled cell phones of every description running 24/7 for real-time remote testing. It’s a boon to developers who must test their work cross-platform and cross-carrier, but are unwilling to spend a small fortune on handsets and contracts.

Read the full article at wired.com

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