DeviceAnywhere lets devs play with 500 phones over the net

DeviceAnywhere is a company that wires cellphone hardware into servers, which are then accessible over the internet. Mainly used by software developers and for cross platform development, instead of buying all the phones you can just rent them and use them over the internet. Talk about the ultimate iPhone hack. Mobile Complete, a software-services company, has pulled an iPhone to pieces and lashed it to a remote-controlled server. Every input and output on the dissected iPhone is electrically hooked up to the net, providing access to would-be iPhone programmers over the web.

DeviceAnywhere is a company that wires cellphone hardware into servers, which are then accessible over the internet. Mainly used by software developers and for cross platform development, instead of buying all the phones you can just rent them and use them over the internet.

Talk about the ultimate iPhone hack. Mobile Complete, a software-services company, has pulled an iPhone to pieces and lashed it to a remote-controlled server. Every input and output on the dissected iPhone is electrically hooked up to the net, providing access to would-be iPhone programmers over the web.

“It’s all occurring electrically on the handset,” says Faraz Syed, CEO of Mobile Complete. “They are surprisingly reliable and robust, even though they look like we’ve cut them open and killed them.”

The service, called DeviceAnywhere, offers about a thousand disassembled cell phones of every description running 24/7 for real-time remote testing. It’s a boon to developers who must test their work cross-platform and cross-carrier, but are unwilling to spend a small fortune on handsets and contracts.

Read the full article at wired.com


Did you like this article?


0 Shares:
You May Also Like

Updating a windows driver can cause Vista to de-activate

The full article ventures into the troublesome problem that will leave you with a de-activated Vista, and the only way to get back to normal would be a call to Microsoft and a new Activation Code. Wasn't Vista going to allow 3 hardware swaps, and then you would be required to re-activate your copy of Vista?
Read More

NASA funded robots to search for life under Arctic ice

NASA funded robots to search for life under Arctic ice -

Filed under:

In a mission that is apparently similar to searching for life under the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa (sans the space travel part), three robots are set to start a mission to explore the underwater hot springs under the ice of the Arctic: because someone else did the Antarctic last year. On a 40 day expedition in July, researchers from Cape Cod hope to use three new robotic vehicles -- two that can operate without cables under ice -- to find life that resides in the hot streams along the techtonic boundary between Eurasia and North America. Although the robots can descend over 3 miles under the water working just meters from the bottom to photograph objects and collect samples, the task of the NASA-funded $450,000 Puma and Jaguar robots will be hindered by the rough terrain and their inability to surface through the ice. Sounds like NASA's got quite a while to go until it can submarine around Europa -- they probably won't be able to surface there at all.
[EnGadget]
Read More

Fiber Optic Table Illuminates Your Dining

Fiber Optic Table Illuminates Your Dining - Deepa writes "We highly doubt LumiGram's Luminous Fiber Optic Tablecloth was designed with power outages in mind, but why hook up a boring string of lamps or fiddle with half melted candles when you can plug this bad boy into the generator? The cloth, which has fiber optics woven throughout, cotton borders, and a Europlug mains adapter, proves most useful when the lights are dimmed, and should prove quite the centerpiece at your next get-together. The illuminating device is available in a trio of sizes, comes in a variety of color schemes."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

[Slasdot]
Read More

SueTube: sex, copyright, and rock & roll

Give this a gander. All of the current lawsuits against YouTube/Google, when they started taking down videos of Russel Peters and other popular shows. I cried.
SueTube: sex, copyright, and rock & roll -

Since its launch, YouTube has been a magnet for controversy. Ars looks at the popular video site's history of threats, lawsuits, and bans with an eye towards understanding what the landscape will look like once the dust settles.

Read More...

[Ars Technica]
Read More

Slashdot’s CmdrTaco Looks Back at 10 Years of ‘News for Nerds’

One of the best technology news sites for nerds, this is one of the sites that I check on a regular basis.
Slashdot's CmdrTaco Looks Back at 10 Years of 'News for Nerds' - Slasdhot turns 10 this month. The influential "news for nerds" site famous for swamping unsuspecting websites with boatloads of traffic turns 10 in October, and parties are popping up all around the country. Without the influence of Slashdot there would be no Digg. Let's pay respects. [Digg Main]
Read More