Comcast Blocks Some Internet Traffic

If you’re a Comcast Customer, then you should be concerned with what they’re doing to your internet connection. Why? Because Comcast is filtering your internet traffic, this article goes in-depth into what exactly is being filtered and tests that prove it is occurring. On one hand it looks like Comcast is trying to keep its network from being stressed with file sharing, on the other it looks like they might not just be filtering file sharing protocols.

If you’re a Comcast Customer, then you should be concerned with what they’re doing to your internet connection. Why? Because Comcast is filtering your internet traffic, this article goes in-depth into what exactly is being filtered and tests that prove it is occurring. On one hand it looks like Comcast is trying to keep its network from being stressed with file sharing, on the other it looks like they might not just be filtering file sharing protocols.

NEW YORK (AP) – Comcast Corp. actively interferes with attempts by some of its high- speed Internet subscribers to share files online, a move that runs counter to the tradition of treating all types of Net traffic equally.

The interference, which The Associated Press confirmed through nationwide tests, is the most drastic example yet of data discrimination by a U.S. Internet service provider. It involves company computers masquerading as those of its users.

If widely applied by other ISPs, the technology Comcast is using would be a crippling blow to the BitTorrent, eDonkey and Gnutella file- sharing networks. While these are mainly known as sources of copyright music, software and movies, BitTorrent in particular is emerging as a legitimate tool for quickly disseminating legal content.

Read the full story at breitbart.com

0 Shares:
You May Also Like

Annoyed, hospitalized teen unplugs neighbor’s life support

Annoyed, hospitalized teen unplugs neighbor's life support -

Filed under:

It should probably go without saying that anything connected to a power source within the confines of a hospital has a fair shot at being pertinent to the livelihood of at least one individual, but obviously a 17-year old teenager in Germany needed the memo. After the perpetual noise of what would prove to be his neighbor's life support machine "got on his nerves," he proceeded to simply unplug the device without precaution in order to ensure that "he got his peace and quiet." Of course, we can only assume that the sirens and squeals that were emitted due to his misreckoning were immensely louder than the prior hum, but some folks just love to learn the hard way. Thankfully, medical personnel stepped in and saved the man from perishing, but the teen at fault lost a lot more sleep after that whilst being questioned by police.

[Via El Reg, image courtesy of NAIAD]

 

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!

[EnGadget]

Sun Microsystems Acquires MySQL

I woke up to a very big announcement today. I was browsing digg and found that MySQL was acquired by Sun Microsystems. You can read more about the acquisition on the MySQL blog of Kaj Arno about the acquisition of MySQL by Sun Microsystems. My take, with Sun releasing Solaris into the Open Source realm, this is just another piece of software that they can put under their belt and package with Solaris. I have included some blurbs from Kaj Arno's blog below.

Featured Linux Download: OS X style widgets with Screenlets

Featured Linux Download: OS X style widgets with Screenlets - Screenlets.png

Linux only: Open-source app Screenlets runs Mac OS X-style widgets on the Linux desktop.

Practically identical to Dashboard widgets and Windows Vista gadgets, Screenlets are small under-the-desktop apps including RSS readers, weather reports, sticky notes, etc. that add a great deal of functionality and convenience mixed with a dash of eye-candy. Screenlets play very well with Beryl and include a bunch of location preferences like always on top, always underneath, etc. Additionally, with the widget plugin for Beryl, you can hide and show your Screenlets exactly the same way you can with Mac OS X widgets.

While there aren't nearly as many Screenlets as gDesklets, kDesklets, or aDesktets, Screenlets tight integration with Beryl makes it a must have for desktop app lovers. Screenlets is a free download for Linux only.

[LifeHacker]