10 Really Useful Flickr Grease Monkey Userscripts.

I’m sure a lot of people are familiar with the FireFox extension called GreaseMonkey. The extension allows you to manipulate the JavaScript present on any website you visit. For instance, if you want to displaying text is a specific way, you can. You can also change the colour or look of site with your own custom JavaScript. 9. Flickr Follow Comments – This useful script helps you to view images that you have commented on – but only those that interest you. If you are writing lots of comments every day you know how hard it is not to get distracted by the overload of images when you click “Comments You’ve made”. With this userscript you have 4 different options to see only certain types of comments.

I’m sure a lot of people are familiar with the FireFox extension called GreaseMonkey. The extension allows you to manipulate the JavaScript present on any website you visit. For instance, if you want to displaying text is a specific way, you can. You can also change the colour or look of site with your own custom JavaScript.

9. Flickr Follow Comments – This useful script helps you to view images that you have commented on – but only those that interest you. If you are writing lots of comments every day you know how hard it is not to get distracted by the overload of images when you click “Comments You’ve made”. With this userscript you have 4 different options to see only certain types of comments.

10. FlickrMailManager – This MailManager is the one of those scripts I will always value, because it makes handling your flickr-inbox much easier. For instance you can “mark all as read”, “delete group invites” and “nuke mailbox”. The processing time depends on the size of your inbox – so I use it very often.

View the entire list at digital-photography-school.com


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