Windows Live SkyDrive gets 1GB of storage

SkyDrive is an online storage service from Microsoft Windows Live. If you wish to sign up and use the SkyDrive service, you would need a Windows Live account as well as be within the United States to be able to use the service.

SkyDrive is an online storage service from Microsoft Windows Live. If you wish to sign up and use the SkyDrive service, you would need a Windows Live account as well as be within the United States to be able to use the service.

Windows Live SkyDrive gets 1GB of storage – Today, Windows Live SkyDrive has received some updates to the service – including everyone now having 1GB of storage. That’s double what was previously there. Along with increased storage, the SkyDrive Team has included a few more things worth taking note of: RSS Feeds on Public Folders: Users can now subscribe to an RSS feed for their Public folders. This allows folks to keep track of each other’s public files and stay up-to-date with what is uploaded. You can subscribe to our Windows Vista Team Blog’s Public SkyDrive folder here. See who uploaded a file: you can now check out and see who has uploaded specific files to your shared folders in SkyDrive. I have quite a few shared folders which are shared out to large groups of friends – it is great to be able to see which files were uploaded by whom. Add a contact directly within SkyDrive: you can now add a friend via Windows Live SkyDrive instead of having to go to Windows Live Messenger or Windows Live Hotmail. Expect to see fixes and tweaks across the board. You’ll also notice that the UI around to Windows Live header has also been tweaked to include easy access to Windows Live Spaces (such as your Friends List and Photos). View: More updates to Windows Live SkyDrive[NeoWin-Main]

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Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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