BetterAWstats 0.12 ALPHA (Default branch)

BetterAWstats 0.12 ALPHA (Default branch) – BetterAWstats is an Web server log analysis tool that provides better statistics from the data provided by AWstats. It is not a replacement for AWstats. The most significant features are rolling months and days, and support for new types of charts (pie, max/min, etc.). License: GNU General Public License (GPL) Changes: Last month daily data was fixed for the case where current has no hits. The menu sorting was fixed for vertical layout. A different format for external links is used now. Unknown browsers and OS are now interlinked with respective tables. Slashes in OS icons were fixed. All functions and globals were renamed to baw_* to make sure they work when betterawstats is included into other projects. Highlighting of current month/day was fixed. Var fixes were applied. A configuration option for inclusion in other projects was added. Datelist-creation was improved. [FreshMeat]
BetterAWstats 0.12 ALPHA (Default branch)Screenshot
BetterAWstats is an Web server log analysis tool that provides better statistics from the data provided by AWstats. It is not a replacement for AWstats. The most significant features are rolling months and days, and support for new types of charts (pie, max/min, etc.).


License: GNU General Public License (GPL)


Changes:
Last month daily data was fixed for the case where
current has no hits. The menu sorting was fixed
for vertical layout. A different format for
external links is used now. Unknown browsers and
OS are now interlinked with respective tables.
Slashes in OS icons were fixed. All functions and
globals were renamed to baw_* to make sure they
work when betterawstats is included into other
projects. Highlighting of current month/day was
fixed. Var fixes were applied. A configuration
option for inclusion in other projects was added.
Datelist-creation was improved.

[FreshMeat]

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