Daniel J. Bernstein releases his code into the public domain!

Daniel J. Bernstein has stated he is releasing his future and previous work under the public domain. You can watch the video of his announcement here.

Daniel J. Bernstein has stated he is releasing his future and previous work under the public domain. You can watch the video of his announcement here.

This is a good idea, however maybe a little too late? Qmail was a popular MTA that required many patches and lots of configuration and general fiddling to get working. Not to mention how it general handles mail the wrong way, unlike Exim or Sendmail which have been around for some time. In general I feel that Qmail is not mature, not regularly maintaned and doesn’t handle mail in a proper fashion. If he came to this conclusion when he first released Qmail, then maybe it would be more than a hassle to work with.

Daemon Tools on the other hand is a great piece of software! Although you want to make sure that you’re using the init system that comes with your distrobution. Daemon Tools does work well with DJB’s other software he has released.

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LG to supply TV converters for US government program

Very interesting, no more analog TV channles. I wonder if Canada will follow suit.
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