Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker

Almost like a RTCW Malware Camp. Would be interesting to see what the bunker looks like. Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunker – Symantec has emerged from its bunker in the British countryside, moving its malware-fighting operations from a former U.K. military nuclear shelter to a more conventional office in Reading. The nuclear bunker, with concrete walls and an obscure entrance on a hillside near Twyford, England, was used for one of the company’s Special Operations Center (SOC). The regional centers are used by security analysts who are part of the company’s Managed Security Services. Companies hire Symantec to help with part or all of their IT security operations. The nuclear shelter may have been good public relations for a security company, but it wasn’t comfortable: It lacked windows and had “sanitation” problems, company officials said. On Wednesday, Symantec offered a tour of its new facility in Reading to journalists, analysts, and customers. The facility, formerly used by storage company Veritas, which Symantec acquired in 2005, has twice as much space as the bunker and was needed to accommodate Symantec’s growth. View: The full story News source: Infoworld Read full story… [NeoWin-Main]

Almost like a RTCW Malware Camp. Would be interesting to see what the bunker looks like.

Symantec outgrows underground nuclear bunkerSymantec has emerged from its bunker in the British countryside, moving its malware-fighting operations from a former U.K. military nuclear shelter to a more conventional office in Reading. The nuclear bunker, with concrete walls and an obscure entrance on a hillside near Twyford, England, was used for one of the company’s Special Operations Center (SOC). The regional centers are used by security analysts who are part of the company’s Managed Security Services. Companies hire Symantec to help with part or all of their IT security operations.

The nuclear shelter may have been good public relations for a security company, but it wasn’t comfortable: It lacked windows and had “sanitation” problems, company officials said. On Wednesday, Symantec offered a tour of its new facility in Reading to journalists, analysts, and customers. The facility, formerly used by storage company Veritas, which Symantec acquired in 2005, has twice as much space as the bunker and was needed to accommodate Symantec’s growth.

View: The full story
News source: Infoworld

Read full story…

[NeoWin-Main]

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Technonia announces Slimline DAP -

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While we're pretty sure the world doesn't need too many more thin, black MP3 players, Korean manufacturer Technonia thinks otherwise. The company has announced a rather MPIO-ish portable audio player -- the 7.5mm thick Slimline. This little guy does pretty much everything you'd expect from something in its class, and really, truly nothing you wouldn't. Those things include playing MP3 and WMV files, tuning in FM radio, and displaying your images on its 1.5-inch OLED screen. 1GB unit on sale by the end of the month in Korea for 90,000KRW (or about $97US).

[Thanks, Doom]

 

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Western Digital developing 20,000RPM drives

That's right, this isn't a joke.
The new drive will be very similar to the recently-released VelociRaptor, in that it’ll be a 2.5in drive with a custom 3.5in housing built around it. Details are incredibly light at this stage, given that the product is still in development, and we don’t even have a release timeframe at the moment. However, our sources said that the drive will be ‘silent’ – that’s the last thing I would have expected from a drive with platters spinning at 20,000 RPM. Western Digital is apparently working on silencing the beast by improving the housing technology, which will now not just act as a heatsink, but also as a noise cancelling device. We’d also hope that the drive enclosure has some vibration dampening technology as well, because that’s also likely to be a problem given the high spindle speeds.
Now they just need push SATA 6.0Gbit/s onto motherboards http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SATA#SATA_6.0_Gbit.2Fs Full artile at bit-tech.net