Good Ways To Join an Open Source Project?

Good Ways To Join an Open Source Project? – Tathagata asks: “I’m a student, on my final year in a college in India, and I have been using GNU/Linux for quite sometime now. Though I’m from a Computer Science background, getting into a project that involves serious programming was not possible, as people (read teachers) run away if you utter the word ‘Linux’. They are generally not bothered about mentoring someone on an exciting project, and they would suggest you to get settled with Visual Basic, .NET, — and would prefer a 24 hour solution when it comes to programming. So, my programming endeavors have remained limited to writing few lines of C/C++, or Java. For last few days, I’ve been googling, and trying to read how to join an existing Open Source project.” What suggestions would you pass along to someone who is willing to join his first Open Source effort? Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]
Good Ways To Join an Open Source Project?Tathagata asks: “I’m a student, on my final year in a college in India, and I have been using GNU/Linux for quite sometime now. Though I’m from a Computer Science background, getting into a project that involves serious programming was not possible, as people (read teachers) run away if you utter the word ‘Linux’. They are generally not bothered about mentoring someone on an exciting project, and they would suggest you to get settled with Visual Basic, .NET, — and would prefer a 24 hour solution when it comes to programming. So, my programming endeavors have remained limited to writing few lines of C/C++, or Java. For last few days, I’ve been googling, and trying to read how to join an existing Open Source project.” What suggestions would you pass along to someone who is willing to join his first Open Source effort?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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