ZFS On Linux – It’s Alive!

This is just lovely. A file system that can take automatic snap shots! ZFS On Linux – It's Alive! – lymeca writes “LinuxWorld reports that Sun Microsystem’s ZFS filesystem has been converted from its incarnation in OpenSolaris to a module capable of running in the Linux user-space filsystem project, FUSE. Because of the license incompatibilities with the Linux kernel, it has not yet been integrated for distribution within the kernel itself. This project, called ZFS on FUSE, aims to enable GNU/Linux users to use ZFS as a process in userspace, bypassing the legal barrier inherent in having the filesystem coded into the Linux kernel itself. Booting from a ZFS partition has been confirmed to work. The performance currently clocks in at about half as fast as XFS, but with all the success the NTFS-3g project has had creating a high performance FUSE implementation of the NTFS filesystem, there’s hope that performance tweaking could yield a practical elimination of barriers for GNU/Linux users to make use of all that ZFS has to offer.” Read more of this story at Slashdot. [Slasdot]

This is just lovely. A file system that can take automatic snap shots!

ZFS On Linux – It's Alive!lymeca writes “LinuxWorld reports that Sun Microsystem’s ZFS filesystem has been converted from its incarnation in OpenSolaris to a module capable of running in the Linux user-space filsystem project, FUSE. Because of the license incompatibilities with the Linux kernel, it has not yet been integrated for distribution within the kernel itself. This project, called ZFS on FUSE, aims to enable GNU/Linux users to use ZFS as a process in userspace, bypassing the legal barrier inherent in having the filesystem coded into the Linux kernel itself. Booting from a ZFS partition has been confirmed to work. The performance currently clocks in at about half as fast as XFS, but with all the success the NTFS-3g project has had creating a high performance FUSE implementation of the NTFS filesystem, there’s hope that performance tweaking could yield a practical elimination of barriers for GNU/Linux users to make use of all that ZFS has to offer.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Back in the carefree but confusing days of the 1980's, chicks and dudes were looking for all kinds of new ways to lessen their need for oil-based energy. If you believe anything you see in this ad mockup (and that's a big "if"), a company in Japan was working on a tiny, in-home nuclear reactor -- pleasantly named Chernobyl. We'll have to assume for the moment that this was pre-catastrophic meltdown, when the Russian power-plant was considered a feat of modern engineering instead of just a big, mutant-making hellride. The device supposedly would have been "simple to operate, even for children and the elderly", but carried an ominous warning to "discontinue use" if you experience "dizziness or a tingling sensation". Was this for real? Read the translation and judge for yourself.

 

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My original colocation machine was FreeBSD 4.2 and it was fun to play with. The package system was great, you could either compile or install pre-compiled versions. However, when you upgrade and leave compiled/pre-compiled packages dormant. They can come back to bit you in the ass with dependency issues and the package database breaking. I'm glad someone is making an effort to make it more user friendly, although I don't run BSD I love a lot of its features. 24-hour Test Drive of PC-BSD - An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica has a concise introduction to PC-BSD, a FreeBSD derivative that emphasizes ease of use and aims to convert Windows users. The review describes the installation process, articulates the advantages of PC-BSD,and reveal some of the challenges that the reviewer faced along the way. From the article: 'In the end, I would suggest this distribution to new users provided they had someone to call in case of a driver malfunction during installation. I would also recommend PC-BSD to seasoned Unix users that have never tried using FreeBSD before and would prefer a shallower learning curve before getting down to business.'"

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Microsoft flip-flops again: now no Vista Home on Macs

I can't believe this is happening, twice in a week two Microsoft proposed changes to allow more functionality and portability are squashed like a bug. This is not going to make consumers happy, and will drive some of them into Apple's arms, and possibly Ubuntu's.
Microsoft flip-flops again: now no Vista Home on Macs -

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We've seen our fair share of flip-flopping in the past, and Microsoft is yet again adding its name to the frowned upon list by retracting previous intentions to allow Windows Vista Home and Home Premium operating systems to run under virtualization. After reportedly stating that it would "change the EULA after listening to customer feedback on the issue," it appears that the suits in Redmond have thought better of said decision. Now, the firm has "reassessed the Windows virtualization policy and decided that maintaining the original policy announced last Fall" would be best. Ben Rudolph, Parallels director of corporate communications, noted that he was "obviously disappointed" in Microsoft's change of heart, but if the two-faced Mac users out there can persuade Google to take their side, we're sure this little spat could be cleared up in no time.

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