AT&T LG Prada-ish phone leaked

More information about the Prada phone in regards to the US version. AT&T LG Prada-ish phone leaked – Woosah. You have no idea how much this leak pisses me off, but that’s neither here nor there. The Gizza has the scoop on the US AT&T version of the LG Prada, which is the CU920 and not the KE850. This, however, seems to be much better with supposed 3G and it’s pretty lightweight. It has iPhone-like zooming when browsing, but a few more steps required. Who knows when this sucker is going to be announced, but the two main touchscreen rivals on the same network? Like whoa.AT&T LG Prada Spy Shots

More information about the Prada phone in regards to the US version.

AT&T LG Prada-ish phone leaked
Woosah. You have no idea how much this leak pisses me off, but that’s neither here nor there. The Gizza has the scoop on the US AT&T version of the LG Prada, which is the CU920 and not the KE850. This, however, seems to be much better with supposed 3G and it’s pretty lightweight. It has iPhone-like zooming when browsing, but a few more steps required. Who knows when this sucker is going to be announced, but the two main touchscreen rivals on the same network? Like whoa.AT&T LG Prada Spy Shots



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